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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 57 (some duplicates have been removed)
, is the u.s. still making any use of military bases and oman as in the past? >> i think we have military cooperation with oman, as we do with many countries, but i will defer the specifics to the pentagon. >> do you have any comment on the new japanese foreign minister? will the secretary have a bilateral meeting with him next week? >> we appreciated his many contributions to the u.s.-japan alliance and his role as foreign minister and we look for to working with him in his new capacity as general secretary of the dpj, and we will continue to work closely with the government of japan and the foreign minister across a broad range of issues between our nations. i am confident there will be high level meetings with japan coming up next week, but i will defer it to announcements that others will make on specifics of the bilaterals. >> we were just told before you got up here you would be making the announcement. >> no, no, there are some meetings the secretary will have, some that the president will have. >> can you go through the secretary's meetings as they are scheduled? >> we are relucta
. >> they'll join us towards the end of the show. in the meantime, we start with the fox news alert because a deadly helicopter crash overnight leaving nine servicemen dead. it's unclear if any of the dead are americans. according to nato, four others were hurt including an american civilian. the crash happened in a province that's a taliban strong hold. the f.b.i. on its way to fort bliss, texas now where a gunman shot two women at a convenience store. the women believed to be clerks are being treated at a local hospital. military police shot the gunman dead. we don't know the identity of the shooter just yet. congress delaying a vote now on a bill to give $7.4 billion to first responders who got sick after the attacks of september 11th. a vote was expected this week but republicans objected to senator harry reid's addition of two amendments including the dream act that provides amnesty to illegal immigrants. those are your headlines. amnesty not to all illegal immigrants but to students who go to college or those who enter the military and here for five years. >> i believe senator hatch c
with north korea, the primary responsibility is north korea's. it brought us to this point, and if we are going to move to a better place, it will be up to north korea to demonstrate it is prepared to engage constructively. >> >> that is really up to north korea to take responsibility for any of its actions. we are all trying to interpret what has happened and work collaborative lead to interment -- collaborative leak to determine the best path for. >> to you believe it depends on china? whenever something happens in the region, there the first for consultation. >> we call the six party process because we of the country's that armas significantly affected by and have the ability to shape peace and security in the region. china has a special responsibility. it has been a leader within the six-party process and we will look to china to demonstrate leadership going forward. china has had recent high-level meetings with the north koreans. we will vow to their sharing their perspective with us -- we will value their sharing their specs -- their perspective with us. they have a special role
. we think the government no longer reflects the will of the american people. nobody is listening us to. 68% of voters say most members of congress don't care what their constituents think that's actualing this movement. >> sean: interesting if you look at nevada or rand paul in kentucky, recently in alaska, christine o'donnell may win tomorrow. the establishment has been out threw attack her and attacking her in this vicious way. conservatives are angry. most conservatives i know, they don't mind a fair and open debate on the issues. mike castle did vote for cap and tax, he did vote for tarp. christine o'donnell said i wouldn't have voted that way. if they lose again tomorrow, what does that say for the republicans, scott? >> well, what it says is the republicans -- republican establishment is going to be in full retreat am i don't know what is going to happen tomorrow. we haven't polled that race. the fact that it is competitive is because of the energy that is coming from the tea party side. republican establishment saying wait a minute, we'll probably win the election in the fall in
is by former u.s. attorney general michael mukasey. again, president obama will have an announcement this afternoon in the white house rose garden. we will have coverage at 1:30 p.m. eastern. until then, an author who has written a book critical of the obama administration. ng this friday, september 17, david limbaugh returns. his latest book is called "crimes against liberty: an indictment of president barack obama." as with the start -- start our discussion, for an author, had a new spirit of the lettuce nonfiction best-seller list. "the new york times" as the book and a number one spot, the second week on the list. "wall street journal" nonfiction, number two. and the combined list of fiction and nonfiction books at "usa today" #28, moving up and not -- #30. why is is selling so well? guest: i think it is resonating. people in america are very scared about what is going on about the bankrupting spending the federal government is doing and the destruction of our liberties and the assaults of individual liberties and assaults on the states, the war against the state, how president o
they stay mentally and physically hit. we have an expert giving us insight into how they're coping. >> they are surviving as a group. not as a bunch of individuals. the psychological management from the surface takes that into account. we are dealing with them as a group and we understand that the secret of their well-being is treating them as a group and not as different individuals. >> speaking to my colleague, timothy wilcox, he joins us live from the mine had. tim, obviously rejoicing, we have seen the pictures, but the fact of the matter is that there is sort of a long ways to go. >> absolutely right. no one is getting any precise readings on when this could be brought to the surface, although we are hearing that it could be sooner than the beginning of november. the man that you were just listening to their, he was saying within a month. we could be looking at the middle of next month. drilling, as seen behind me, moving in from the oil industry, continuing all live long, yesterday reaching 78 meters with a capacity for drilling a very wide bore very quickly, but it keeps on
're document, and engaging in a discussion. here are the phone numbers. if you are a democrat, join us. rep conditions, join us, and independents, join us. good morning once again, this is the kind of discussion i can promise you would only happen on c-span. 34 years ago we used to call us the place where the constitution came to live every day, because it gave you a running example of the three branches of government and the live coverage of the congress, executive branch and what we told you about the supreme court so we couldn't let constitution day go by without a discussion. seems like we're hearing more and more about it these days, and on the front page of the washington times in a story about constitution day, david eisner who runs the national constitution center in philadelphia explains why. here is the story. he writes -- the tea party has got people thinking more seriously about what's in the constitution and what's not. that's the quote from the political analyst with american enterprise institute but they say it would be wrong to assume tea party movement was -- >> supreme cou
. four simple words mercedes benz lives by to this day. the best, or nothing. that is what drives us. >> additional funding provided by these funders. >> and by bloomberg. a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide. ♪ captioning sponsored by rose communications >> from london, a special edition of "charlie rose." >> charlie: lord peter mandelson is here. he's a member of britain's how was lords, former cabinet minister under prime ministers tony blair and gordon brown, a key architect of the labour campaign that helped his party rise to power in 1997. he served as secretary of state for trade and industry, secretary of state for northern ireland and secretary of state for business. he has now written a book about those years of public service. it is called "the third man, life at the heart of new labour," i am pleased to have peter mandelson back on this program. welcome. >> nice to be back. >> charlie: let me get to some of the controversy first. that tony blair is not happy that your book is coming out as it did, because -- and that somehow it's created a li
-tongued rhetoric which dragged us into it. a lot of people thought it was a good idea and yet now conveniently within britain and many other countries it's blamed on this george bush and his cleverred-tonged mood until tony blair. think think he wants to say, no i was a bigger figure than that. >> rose: also from london, an old friend of this program, john burns now the london bureau chief of the "new york times". >> we were perhaps transfixed by the relief would come to iraq with the overthrowing of saddam and yes maybe we should have spent more time difficult as it would have been under saddam to look at the trauma, the psychological trauma inflicted on iraq by the ba'ath party and saddam over a period of 30 years. all of that it can accept. if i had to do it over again i would have looked at that because it was the fractured pitch thatter that society in part along with saddam terror overground as government going underground as an insurgency that made the american venture in iraq next to impossible to achieve. >> couric: from london john and john when we come back. captioning sponsored by
to middle east peace. and struggles to find a voice on the economy. >> can you guys still hear us? >> analysis from the "roundtable" with george will, thomas friedman. paul krugman, and mary jordan. >>> and "the sunday funnies." >> it's labor day. one day a year, we honor our workforce. do we still have a workforce? i don't know. do we? >>> today marks a new beginning for "this week." through our partnership with the bbc, we're delighted that as of now, this program is being broadcast globally in more than 200 countries. we begin with one of the most polarizing figures on the international stage, tony blair. this week, the former british prime minister released his memoir, "a journey" and we sat down for his first north american interview. during ten tumultuous years -- at the center of world events, the iraq war is his most controversial legacy. this week, anti-war protesters showed up in force in dublin at the former prime minister's book signing. as well as taking his country to war in iraq and afghanistan, his interventions in kosovo, sierra leone. and northern ireland brought
and europeans coming here, we stand up for what we believe in. nothing did more to destroy us as politicians is that we only said what was favorable to a particular audience. >> what did you hear? >> i am impressed by everyone here. i would like to say that i'm not remotely racist and i'm not entirely in less, less british then you are. we have to become united is a country and we're not at the moment. we have to be fair to all immigrants, but we have to expect them to accept our culture. to lets move on candidates question. >> dan referred to earlier. in the last week, have challenged the media consensus that there is no alternative except to cut spending now and that we should spend more on housing and jobs to support the economic recovery. what other areas to the canada is think we need to challenge the media consensus in order to run the argument for the margin the biggest political problem is looking into an aisle at the financial system relation. we have to set forward a credible alternative. we need to pay back the deficit. more should come from taxes, because times like this, if you
is an example of what we are up against. >> benjamin netanyahu thanked the u.s. president for his efforts and described the talks says "open and productive." >> id president's statement is an expression of our -- i think the president's statement is an expression of our determination to fight and you have talks that are open, productive, and serious in the quest for peace, also centered around the need for security arrangements that are able to roll back this kind of terror and threats to security. and that is a fundamental element, an important foundation of the peace we seek, and i appreciate, mr. president, your efforts to advance this beast -- peace for us and our neighbors and, i think we can say, the world. >> mr. obama also welcomed the leaders of the palestinian and the israelis. king abdullah and other leaders will join the talks. but is there it now and new commitment to achieve peace? our correspondent reports from the west bank on what are the unresolved tensions. >> on a hill overlooking the city of jerusalem, hundreds of jewish settlers came to bury the dead. the symmetry is
jailed in teheran, about today's release and what it tells us about the regime. >> brown: then margaret warner interviews former british prime minister and united nations envoy tony blair about the newest round of middle east peace talks. >> i find it hard to see if these two political leader s in this context with an american administration pushing for a deal, if we can't get one, i don't know where we go from there. >> ifill: fred de sam lazaro has the story of a jewish entrepreneur working with palestinians and israelis for both peace and profit. >> brown: susan dentzer of "health affairs" and karen tumulty of the "washington post" sort through the latest give- and-take on health care politics. >> ifill: and we sit down with writer and cartoonist austin kleon for a dose of poetry inspired by newspaper prose. >> what i found out is that i need to treat the newspaper as a blank canvas in order to really come up with a good poem. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions a
word. >> one we should all use today. >> like turning starbucks products into gold. >> or sand. >> i think it is. another great story from the west coast we will be talking about in a little bit. bill clinton, somehow managing to get right smack-dab in the middle of that california gubernatorial campaign. he's not even trying. this guy, jerry brown and bill clinton, these guys just hate each other and impacting that race. >> here's my guess, although bill clinton is now in the middle of that race spiritually, my guess is physically, corporately, he may not be at jerry brown's side campaigning on his behalf before november 2nd. >> jerry brown, i forgot this, he refused to endorse bill clinton in 1992, after clinton had locked down the nomination. >> it's true. >> jerry brown, the first guy to bring up whitewater. jerry brown, a guy that bill clinton, just to set the back story, remember the '92 debate, where clinton gets read -- how dare you attack my wife? before we get to the news. >> it's primary day -- >> hold on. i got you guys some gifts, really quickly. >> oh. >> tuscaloosa. th
carbon emissions, let me tell you what will not work. it would not work to use cat and trade. cap and trade is being put out as the way to solve this problem. cap and trade is the notion that we will set a limit on how much carbon emissions there will be. we will deal out the cards to people who get to the met this much carbon, and then we will say what -- now somebody else wants to reduce carbon, you have to buy one of these emissions permits. at the same meeting where i met t.j. rodgers, i also met jeff in help from general electric. just in health -- jeff, after giving an impassioned speech about how greene general electric -- she might have thought they were green electric rather than general electorate -- how greene generally lesser was and how -- how greene general electric was and how deserving they were to get this, more efficient engines, and so on and so forth. he capped it quite well when i asked him a question, were they really that green or with a just lobbying? he got a little bit mad, and he said, if you are not at the table, you're on the menu. let that soak in for
by this storm as it passed through here overnight where or when or while many of us slept. >> did you call your college-age son in halifax to get a weather update? >> no, i'm going to give him a shout. like we discussed earlier, he is of college age. there really is no point me calling him at this time of morning because i'm not going to get anything that makes sense out of him anyway. i did talk to actually the canadian national weather service, essentially they've been saying to people, look, before you venture out, take a look out the window at the weather. that's their idea of a warning tlup because they get all kinds of storms and they're very used to it up there. what the heck? they're hearty canadians up there. >> pretty good advice any way you look at it. we'll get more from you later kevin. >> see you, earl. >> see yeah. >>> we have the latest on where tropical storm earl is headed. for that we go to meteorologist bill karins. good morning to you. >> good saturday morning to you. earl just brushed nantucket passing safely about 100 miles off the coast. that meant only winds around 40 t
out to sell books because of protests for one reason or the other. they use all of the sense of animus, it seems. what is it about? >> it's difficult to say, really. i mean, first of all, you know, as i always point out to people, i did win three elections rather than lose them. >> rose: (laughs) yes, you did. yes, and some say you should have quit then. >> some say i should never have started. but you can't listen to all those voices. and also, frankly, there's a huge difference between the people who will come and protest, the people no who throw things at you are not, in my book, normal people. most normal people, even though they disagree with you, have a disagreement with you, they don't feel the need to either shout at you or throw something at you, they just say "well, i disagree." there was a poll just a few days ago that showed on balance a positive appreciation of my time as prime minister. is so i think this thing is... parts of, frankly, you live as a progress progressive politician as well with parts of the right of the media can be pretty aggressive when taking you on. wh
%. give us the lowest corporation tax in the g-7. and that is a huge advert in this program, by the way, it is a good low corporate tax environment. >> rose: that's what ireland did exactly. >> and i think now they were able to take it quite a lot further than 24%. but nevertheless, from we're taking it from 28% to 24%. if you think of many people in my situation, many people sitting in a room like this, in faced with a very high budget deficit we would be very tempted to put up business taxes. but because, precisely because i want to give-- given growth and private sector investment and job creation, that i'm actually going in the other direction and reducing business taxes. >> rose: but the president is making in the united states the exact opposite decision. >> every country has got to make his own decisions. and the american administration has got challenges just like the british government has got. challenges. but actually, if you look at, from what i can gather, the u.s. administration is concerned about infrastructure. we've concerned about infrastructure. we're protecting the ca
difficult. >> rose: in u.s. they are not just cutting fat they are cutting to the muscle. >> they are cutting it back in a big way. >> they have to do two things, make the case for paring back and cutting back in public spending without cuting the roots of future economic growth in this country. therefore, focus on your priorities. don't just take out sort of an axe across the whole waterfront of public spending and investment. make sure that as you make your savings, cut down your expenditure, make your economy, do not axe those things on which our future economic growth depend. >> this new government here will be doing some difficult things. and people will be reminded of the fact that the decision makers-- . >> rose: but are you in favor of them doing difficult things i understand. >> i am favor of them doing difficult things but i think it also alters the way you people look at domestic policy. >> rose: i poke to george osborne about these and other issues today in an interview earlier at his office here in london. >> here is that conversation. first of all, thank you
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 57 (some duplicates have been removed)